Native SpeciesHighbush cranberry

Viburnum trilobum
FOUND by Pink Panthers o...
2015-11-09
Raymond
ID Questioned
Quality checked by The Pink Panthers of Death
Peer reviewed by FancyTommy
Field Notes
We think that we found our species without to much difficlty. During our investigation, we could smell the chilly air and frost, we hear birds chirping and crunchy leaves. We were surprised that we found the American Cranberrybush, because we didn't have many places to look. The one problem that we ran into was that it is getting close to winter so everything had frost over it. This made it harder to compare the plant to the pictures because the plant had lost a lot of leaves.
A sketch of our study site.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
The color of the berries that were in the tree were bright red, just like they were on the Species ID Card.
Photo of my evidence.
The shape of the leaf, a teardrop shape, was the same as what appeared on the Species ID Card.
Photo of my evidence.
We found berries and leaves that look like the ones on the Species ID Card, and also the branches looked the same, thin.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Viburnum trilobum
Common name:
Highbush cranberry
Count of individuals: 
50+
Coverage: 
Between 1/4 and 1/2
Reproduction: 
Fruit (plants)
Sampling method: 
Just looking around
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
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Map this species
Latitude: 
N 43.938400 °
Longitude: 
W -70.445400 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Upland - Field
Trip Information
Name:
JSMS
Trip date: 
Mon, 2015-11-09 08:40
Town or city: 
Raymond
Type of investigation: 
Species and Habitat Survey
Ecosystem: 
Upland
Watershed: 
Presumpscot
Habitat Observations
Species diversity: 
Evidence of vectors: 
Tree canopy cover: 
Soil moisture: 

Comments

Unfortunately, you have not found highbush cranberry. The word trilobum in the latin name refers to three lobed leaves, similar to a maple leaf. The leaves on your photo look more like a species of cherry.