Invasive SpeciesJapanese knotweed

Fallopia japonica
FOUND by barnacle
2018-09-12
Bangor
ID Confirmed
Quality checked by Hedgehog
Peer reviewed by Penguin
Field Notes
Our study site (William S. Cohen School) was located on a developed area, but that does not matter for the Japanese Knotweed can grow practically anywhere. In investigation of the plant, we noticed that the plant had several bamboo-like stems instead of a single trunk. We further deduced that the Japanese Knotweed can grow without much sunlight, because large leafy trees were located everywhere around the plant. The flowers were small and delicate, bland white and clustered together on the branches. The leaves were small and could fit in our hand. They were spade-shaped, and had the pattern of almost parallel ovals along the middle of the leaf.
A sketch of our study site.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
We found that the Japanese Knotweed (fallopia japonica) has woody, bamboo-like stems. The stems appear to have joints, and they are all hollow. Being hollow, they made good homes for reproducing insects. We know that this is not Giant Knotweed because the stems are browner, whilst the Giant Knotweed stems are green. The stems at the very base are clustered together, but clearly individual stems. In other words, the Japanese Knotweed does not have a singular trunk that it grows from.
Photo of my evidence.
In further evidence, we compared the leaves of what we found, Japanese Knotweed, and the Giant Knotweed which is very similar. Our plant, as described in the definitions of Japanese Knotweed leaves, had no hairs on the undersides. Giant Knotweed does. Not to mention, our plant had spade-shaped leaves, as described in Japanese Knotweed definitions. Giant Knotweed has heart-shaped leaves, unlike our plant. Giant Knotweed also has 15-40 cm in length, while Japanese Knotweed has up to 18 cm long.
Photo of my evidence.
Finally, the stems to which the flowers are attached. In our plant, there were small orange joints. We found that all Japanese Knotweed had those. Giant Knotweed, on the other hand, does not. Typically, the flowers in Japanese Knotweed are larger than the leaf below. Vice versa for the Giant Knotweed. The plant that we found had flowers larger than the leaf. So, we further detirmined that we had found Japanese Knotweed.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Fallopia japonica
Common name:
Japanese knotweed
Count of individuals: 
1-10
Coverage: 
Reproduction: 
Flower (plants)
Pollinators (plants)
Eggs (animals)
Sampling method: 
Quadrat (user-placement)
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
We’re sorry, JavaScript is required to view the map. If JavaScript is you may wish to upgrade to a newer browser in order to view this map.
Map this species
Latitude: 
N 44.811078 °
Longitude: 
W -68.755622 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Upland - Developed areas
Trip Information
Name:
Cohen School grounds
Trip date: 
Wed, 2018-09-12 09:48
Town or city: 
Bangor
Type of investigation: 
Species and Habitat Survey
Ecosystem: 
Upland
Watershed: 
Penobscot
Habitat Observations
Species diversity: 
1 different species
Evidence of vectors: 
Paved road
People
Recent disturbance
Construction
Tree canopy cover: 
Between 1/2 and 3/4
Soil moisture: 
Moist

Comments

I really liked all of your pictures! They weren't blurry, they weren't all the same, and they matched your definitions. Great job!!

I really liked all of your pictures! They weren't blurry, they weren't all the same, and they matched your definitions. Great job!!